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Adorable 5 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Appomattox Co!

Located in Historic Pamplin City,in Historic Appomattox County! Built in 1920, enjoy the genuine feel of this arts and crafts bungalow style home. The owner has lovingly cared for this grand home complete with original doors glass door knobs, picture rail throughout many rooms including the spacious bedrooms, carved wall corners, beautiful wide baseboards and 1'' wide hardwood floors. A spacious 5 bedroom home with a main level bedroom, 2 full baths, a mud room and walk in pantry just off the kitchen. There are original French doors separating the formal living and dining rooms. The cellar is old and dark (like most cellars) but is accessible from inside or outside and there's even an old coal shoot door. Complete with rocking chair front porch, goldfish pond and ancient landscape such as the most glorious magnolia.   CONTACT The Lynchburg Team Lynchburg Real Estate Services Dawson Ford Garbee Today to schedule a Showing (434) 879-3275

Samantha Mason

Samantha Mason

 

Love What You Do!

The Lynchburg Team Lynchburg Real Estate Services has recently joined the firm Dawson Ford Garbee & Co. in their 221 office.  We are actively looking for buyers for all of our listings with our marketing team to get our listings sold.  Buying or Selling your home does not have to be as painful as you may feel.  We work as a team to make things as effortless and easy for our clients and to get your home sold in the LEAST amount of time, and for the MOST amount of money.  The Lynchburg Team Lynchburg Real Estate Services, Dawson Ford Garbee & Co. (434) 879-3275   Call Us Today.        

Samantha Mason

Samantha Mason

 

Weekly Economic Review

New home construction took off, and lay-offs tumbled, while retail sales experienced an unexpected dip. 

New Home Construction 

Construction on new homes enjoyed a sizable surge, growing 9.8 percent to an annual rate of 1,174,000, the Census Bureau reported last week. In comparison to June 2014, this marked a considerable 26.6 percent annual increase. The key driver in last month’s new home construction was multi-family unit ground-breakings, which increased 29.4 percent. Meanwhile, new construction on single-family homes actually shrank 0.9 percent to a rate of 685,000. 

“In contrast to the multi-family segment, which has been on a clear upward path for some time now, the single-family segment continues to amble along, heading higher but not with any great sense of urgency,” Regions Financial Corp. Chief Economist Richard Moody told the Wall Street Journal. 

Building permits issued in June for new home construction grew 7.4 percent to an annual rate of 1,343,000, which was a whopping 30 percent over June 2014 estimate of 1,033,000. Permits for single-family home construction issued in June grew 0.9 percent to a rate of 687,000.

Some economists warned that permits and starts on multi-family housing could shrink in coming months, as tax incentives in some markets, especially New York, come to an end.

“We have to expect a big correction in July,” Pantheon Macroeconomics Chief Economist Ian Shepherdson told the Journal.

Initial Jobless Claims 

After seeing a surge in lay-offs a week prior, initial jobless claims experienced some good news. First-time claims for employment benefits filed by the newly laid off during the week ending July 11 fell to 281,000, a plummet of 15,000 claims from the previous week’s total of 296,000, the Employment and Training Administration reported last week. That performance kept lay-offs well within the range of what’s considered a growing job market. 

“The trend in claims continues to point to labor market improvement,” BNP Paribas Economist Derek Lindsey told MarketWatch. 

The four-week moving average, considered a more stable measure of lay-off activity, did not see large swings in either direction during the past few week’s of the Administration’s reports, including this week’s. The average ticked up slightly to 282,500 claims, a gain 3,250 claims from the preceding week’s average of 279,250. 

Retail Sales 

Retail sales continued to see volatile performance, with retail and food services sales dropping 0.3 percent to $442.0 billion in June sales, the Census Bureau reported last week. While the contraction was unwelcome, retail sales are still growing over time, with June’s performance totaling 1.4 percent higher than June 2014. 

“Consumer fundamentals still appear pretty favorable, particularly the vigorous gains in job creation, but household caution still appears to be holding back a more rapid pace of spending growth,” J.P. Morgan Chief U.S. Economist Michael Feroli told the Wall Street Journal. 

Segments that experienced sizable downturns included furniture and home stores, which experienced a 1.6 percent decline in sales; clothing and accessories sales, which saw sales drop 1.5 percent; and building material and garden stores, which dropped 1.3 percent. Some sectors that saw positive performance included sales at electronics stores, which grew 1 percent; gas station sales, which grew 0.8 percent; and sales at general merchandise stores, which grew 0.7 percent. 

For more details on your neighbor hoods real estate sales call 434-879-3275, The Lynchburg Team - Lynchburg Real Estate Services. 

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

Searching for that dream job? Check out The Lynchburg Team - Lynchburg Real Estate Services

Do you want to join a team that can help your business grow? The Lynchburg Team - Lynchburg Real Estate Services needs help with servicing their leads database. We offer something completely unique compared to other companies/teams. See below what we are looking for: 1. Experience in Sales and Customer Service 2.Experience with real estate a plus but our team is willing to train the right person 3. Great follow up skills and communication 4. Driven and Dedicated 5. Availability  What we provide: 1. The Lynchburg Team pays for ALL marketing materials and branding, signs, lock boxes, etc. 2.We offer top of the line training, scripts, and have the best administrative staff to make your job as easy as possible - ALL FREE TO YOU 3. We hand feed you leads to work - all you have to do is the follow up  4. We offer the best technology out there to make your real estate career organized and effortless 5. We are a team - we are always there to help each other with appointments, writing contracts, etc.  6. We have our own computer software developer that sets us apart from the rest with our lead tracking systems, client database, and contract to close systems.  Call today if you are interested in starting your career in Real Estate: 434-879-3275

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

Picking the Perfect Paint Color for Your Bathroom

Donald Trump once said, "It's tangible, It's sold, It's beautiful, It's artistic, from my standpoint, and I just love real estate." This is how we feel here at The Lynchburg Team Real Estate Services, every time we get to serve our community whether it be professionally with our clients, or in the community events that we contribute to.  Our Philosophy is to provide you with the BEST customer serves above and beyond, and hope that you will have the best experience working with our team.
  That said, what I really wanted to talk about today was Paint colors, Specifically bathroom paint colors. When I was studying Interior Design, I learned about perspectives and light and how it will affect your space.  I recently read an article on the subject that gave tips on the same subject.

    The best way to finish off a bathroom remodeling job is a fresh coat of paint in the color or colors of your choice. For best results, always begin by cleaning and sanding all surfaces that need to be painted, and apply primer for a smooth, clean finish. Remember that paint isn't the only way to introduce color into your bathroom; you can also use coordinated accessories such as bathmats, toothbrush and tissue holders, and towels to accentuate your color scheme.  If you aren't a very creative person, colorblind, or just have no idea what looks good together many of the local stores, such as Walmart or Bed, Bath and Beyond, make picking out accessories very easy as they are grouped together by  styles that match and coordinate, and they are also very affordable.
    Browse online photo galleries, such as the Bathroom Decor gallery at Good Housekeeping, for ideas and inspiration. Adding color to your bathroom will affect the overall mood of the room, so decide what you want your colors to express. Blue, for example, conveys a feeling of relaxation and ties in with water, as noted at Pioneer Thinking. Warm, cream and peach-tinted tones accentuate lighting in the bathroom, which is practical for makeup application. Two or more colors create a more dramatic effect. As you look for inspiration, take note of any color schemes or ideas that stand out to you for future reference. Also, if you find an object of the color you want you can bring that to your local paint store, and most likely they can match it dead- on.  They will provide color samples also to choose from. If you are using multiple colors, consult a color wheel to determine which colors are complementary. The Paint Quality Institute provides a digital color wheel, as well as color recommendations for specific moods and themes. Many home improvement stores also provide color matching machines, which scan a colored textile or piece of tile from your bathroom and mix a matching paint sample. .     Get a second opinion on your color choices. Family members and friends are a good place to start. If you want a more professional opinion, meet with a decorator or remodeling consultant to discuss your plans.  My personal recommendations for paint or wallpaper ( which is very much in style right now) is James. T. Davis on Candlers Mountain Road which is a local business and we love to support or local businesses and they have an excellent reputation as well.       I hope that you find this information useful, and Stay cool and safe during the July 4th holiday. Please like our Facebook page for more useful articles, news and events like Our Team, rappelling off of the Bank of The James building in downtown Lynchburg in September.   Thank you!

Samantha Mason

Samantha Mason

 

Cost of Living in Lynchburg

http://www.newsadvance.com/work_it_lynchburg/news/report-cost-of-living-in-lynchburg-percent-cheaper-than-national/article_5e2ce878-0b09-11e5-af9f-9f4fdaacf26e.html#.VYSAMXxBVwU.gmail

Thomas Deans

Thomas Deans

 

Preparing your home for hot weather

Preparing Your Home for Hot Weather             As warm weather rolls across most of the country, it’s time to start thinking about how to protect and care for your home when the mercury soars. What can you do to ensure the summer sun doesn’t cause damage to your home? 

Heat stays out, cool stays in.
That’s the general idea, right? Check the weather stripping around doors and windows to make sure you don’t have a leak where your air conditioning can escape. This is a good time to assess the state of your insulation as well. Many power companies also offer home energy-efficiency assessments — often at no cost — to help you pinpoint places where the heat is creeping in, and often they’ll supply solutions too.

Perform an A/C checkup.
Don’t wait until you really need the air conditioning to make sure it's working properly! If something goes wrong at the height of summer, it could be weeks before repairs can be made. Replace your HVAC unit’s filters, and consider having your air ducts and vents cleaned out and the seals checked.

Turn it around.
Your ceiling fan, that is: Many types have a way to reverse the direction they spin. In summer, the blades should rotate counterclockwise in order to maximize the fan’s beneficial effect on your home’s temperature. 

Scout the perimeter.
Most people spend more time outdoors when temperatures rise. Check the boundaries of your property for damage to fences, security lights, and gate locks. Clear away any long grass that may have grown up next to fences as they can harbor fleas and ticks. Reset timers on sprinklers and outdoor lights in consideration of the longer hours of daylight.

Paint: It’s not just for looks.
Although we generally think of a new coat of paint as a cosmetic indulgence, it actually helps to protect the home from the effects of strong heat and sun. While you’re at it, check the deck to see if it needs a fresh coat of sealant as well. Washing the windows will ensure you can enjoy the summer sunshine. And speaking of windows, check screens and shutters for damage too. 

Prepare to party.
If you love to entertain outdoors, or you want to live off barbecue for the next few months, your summer fun equipment will need a good once-over. Hose down patio furniture and check cushions to see if they would benefit from a good wash and a chance to dry in the fresh air or if they’ll need to be replaced. Clean off the bbq and fill the propane tank [or stock up on briquettes]. 

Scale the heights.
Before it gets too hot, an inspection of the roof and attic is a great idea. Check outside for missing shingles or other signs of damage. Trim back tree branches that could be used by local critters as stepping stones to get onto and then under your roof. Check out the gutters while you’re up there too. Then head inside to examine the attic for leaks, holes, and signs of animal trespass.    Know of anyone looking to Buy or Sell Real Estate? Give us a call - your trusted real estate resource - The Lynchburg Team - Lynchburg Real Estate Services 434-879-3275

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

Budget Ideas for People Who Hate to Budget

Follow these three tips to effectively budget your money, even if you hate spreadsheets. Raise your hand if you think sitting down with a spreadsheet full of numbers sounds like a good time. Chances are, there aren’t many hands in the air — but if you want to do more with your money and have a positive impact on your financial situation — whether or not you hope to buy a house someday, it’s critical. We’re talking about budgets. You need one so you can take charge of your finances and meet your biggest money goals. Before you roll your eyes and groan, understand that you have a lot of options here. Just because you hate boring spreadsheets or the hassle of keeping up with receipts does not mean you actually hate budgets. More likely, you haven’t found the right one for you yet. Let’s explore a few budget ideas you can try. 1. Make it automatic You don’t have to create a household budget that sucks away all your free time and mental energy. Instead, automate it with one of the tools and technologies available to help you do it. Mint.com can help you track your spending and understand where your money goes each month. You Need a Budget is budgeting software that promises to “implement a system that will require less time ‘managing’ your money.” Personal Capital combines your everyday finances with your investments so you can view the big picture of your financial situation all in one place. Setting up these tools can help you track your expenses and review your spending each month. They make budgeting easier and lots more fun. You can also set automatic transfers from your checking to savings accounts to fund important goals and create automatic bill pay so you never forget to handle a fixed expense. 2. Give yourself an allowance Weekly or monthly allowances aren’t just for kids. A grown-up spending allowance can help you better manage your money each month while also eliminating the need to track every last cent with a dreaded spreadsheet. For this budgeting alternative to work, you do need to put in some effort upfront. First, know how much you earn each month — and that means the amount of money hitting your checking account after taxes and withdrawals for things like your 401(k) and health insurance. Then calculate your fixed expenses. This includes things like rent, utilities, groceries, transportation, and other living costs and bills. Subtract your expenses from your income. If you haven’t already set up an automatic transfer to savings or investments, do so now. After taking into account your savings and expenses, what’s left over? This is your spending allowance for the month. You can spend it on whatever you want, but once that money is gone, remember, it’s gone. 3. Use various accounts for your buckets A twist on the allowance idea is to set up three accounts: one for expenses, one for fun money, and one for savings. Deposit percentages of your paycheck into each account, and pull from the appropriate one throughout the month to cover your living costs and your discretionary spending. You’ll need to do some legwork first to determine what percentage of your paycheck belongs in which bucket. But you don’t need to track every last cent throughout the month or worry about overspending before you get around to saving. Budgeting doesn’t have to be all checkbook balancing and spreadsheet managing. Have a little fun with it, try out different types of budgets, and learn what works — and makes the most sense — for you. - See more at: http://www.trulia.com/blog/budget-ideas-for-people-who-hate-budgets/?ecampaign=cnews&eurl=www.trulia.com%2Fblog%2Fbudget-ideas-for-people-who-hate-budgets%2F#sthash.i2AEB97f.dpuf  

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

The Lynchburg Team is going Over the Edge for HumanKind!

The Lynchburg Team - Lynchburg Real Estate Services is raising money to Go Over the Edge for HumanKind. HumanKind, formerly Presbyterian Homes & Family Services and Family Alliance is a non profit organization of more than 100 years of influence in the community. They serve more than 7,370 people through five main focus area: Early Childhood Development, Mental Health Services, Residential Care and Safe & Healthy Living, they strive to strengthen individuals & families through care, counseling and education in order to build a stronger community. Your generosity to send us Over the Edge for HumanKind will impact lives all over Lynchburg, Virginia and allow me to raise the bar, literally, on fundraising in my community. At HumanKind, they believe small acts of kindness can change the world - but that kind of impact begins right here with people like you. - See more at: http://give.humankind.org/site/TR/BecomeampEdger/General?px=1045201&pg=personal&fr_id=1080#sthash.KKv0Dn3G.5cg5007I.dpuf Send me over the edge for HumanKind - The Lynchburg Team - Lynchburg Real Estate Services is going over the edge for HumanKind in September but we need to raise a total of $3000 ($1000 for each team member that has volunteered to go over) in order to rappel off the top of the tallest building downtown Lynchburg. Jeremy Mason w/ The Lynchburg Team-Lynchburg Real Estate Services, Katherine Farber and Brandon Farber are all three supporting one of our team's favorite non-profit organizations. So please share and donate today - every little bit helps! Click the link below to donate today.  http://give.humankind.org/site/TR/BecomeampEdger/General?px=1045201&pg=personal&fr_id=1080    

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

Buying Vs. Renting your home

Owning a home has many benefits. When you make a mortgage payment, you are building equity-and that's an investment.Owning a home also qualifies you for tax benefits that may assist you in dealing with your new financial responsibilities-such as homeowners' insurance, real estate taxes,and upkeep, which can be substantial. But given the freedom, stability, and security of
owning your own home, they are definitely worth it! Owning your own home also can be a great source of pride and stability.  But home ownership may not be for everyone. It's a big financial commitment starting with the initial shock of your purchase (including a down payment and fees paid to a real estate agent, the lender and others) followed by years of monthly mortgage payments, real estate taxes, property insurance, and maintenance costs. When you decide to purchase a home, you accept responsibility for paying for these expenses. They are additional costs to your monthly mortgage payment and should be included in your budget estimates: Property Taxes and Special Assessments, Home/Hazard Insurance, Utilities, Maintenance, Home Owner Association (HOA) Fee if applicable One of the advantages of renting is being generally free of most maintenance responsibilities and the flexibility of moving almost as soon as you decide. But by renting, you lose the chance to build equity, take advantage of tax benefits, and protect yourself against rent increases. Also, you may not be free to decorate without permission and may be at the mercy of the landlord for your housing needs.  Consider these questions
when making your choice: Do you want to spend several years
in a house and in a neighborhood?

Do you enjoy lawn and garden
work?

Might you need to move suddenly to
care for family?

Do you want to keep your assets
accessible in the bank, or do you
want to invest long-term in a home?  

Thomas Deans

Thomas Deans

 

3 Tips to Staging the Outside of Your Home Like a Pro

Are you considering putting your house up for sale, but not sure where to start? Afraid it will take too long to sell, or that you won’t get the price you want? Think about “staging” your home, or in other words, setting the scene for immediate buyer interest in your property. To be really effective, you need to look at both the outside and the inside of your home. Here are 3 tips to get you started with the outside of your home: 1. Go stand on the street to see what clients see when driving up to the house. Be aware that any negative impressions they get outside the house (landscaping not maintained or non-existent, peeling paint, etc.) is just going to make them think that the house itself has not been well taken care of. So even if you have spent the time and money to fix up the interior, it would all be wasted if the clients get a bad first impression as they drive up to the house. 2. Next, step outside your front door and close the door; then stand on the stoop and look around for 5 minutes. While the realtor fumbles for keys and tries to figure out how to open the door, the clients are standing behind and looking around. So what are they seeing? Dead plants, old Halloween decorations in the middle of January, cobwebs?  Again, not a good first impression! It’s definitely worth it to take some time and clean it up. Want to go a step further? Try a new coat of paint or some new furniture or accessories. 3. Don’t forget the backyard. While that might not be part of the potential buyers’ first impression experience, you still should make sure it’s in the best condition possible. Pull up weeds, water plants, do some sweeping (if that’s applicable in your case) and maybe even purchase new furniture or accessories (plant pots, bird houses, etc.) And the biggest tip of all? Imagine yourself as a potential buyer looking at your property for the very first time. What impressions are you getting? Would YOU buy your house? What would you like to see changed before you put an offer on your house? And don’t worry about spending several thousand dollars to get your house ready to sell – you’ll get it all back when your house sells. Proper staging helps you sell your house in a shorter time and at the price you want.

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

Auction For Action - GREAT ITEMS MUST SEE EVERYTHING THAT IS OFFERED!!

Check out some of these great items including a $50 gift certificate to Dish, Flex tickets to LU for any sporting event for 2015 -2016 valued at $100 (10 tickets total), NFL autographed items, NASCAR autographed baseball hats, spa gifts sets, Water park tickets, and so much more - AUCTION FOR ACTION to help support a great organization that helps so many in need. CLICK AND BID TODAY!!!! Click the link below and and start bidding. You only have a few days to win!   http://livingbread2015.eflea.ca/view  

Katherine Farber

Katherine Farber

 

Last Week's Economic News in Review

Incomes and spending saw growth, but it was behind expectations, while layoffs tumbled to their lowest point in 15 years, and construction spending contracted. 

Incomes and Spending 

Incomes and spending saw growth, but it was less than expected. Personal incomes skirted up a scant $6.2 billion (less than 0.1 percent) in March, with disposable personal income (DPI; income after taxes) increasing $1.6 billion (again, less than 0.1 percent), according to last week’s report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Meanwhile, personal consumption expenditures (PCE), which describes household spending on goods and services, grew by $53.4 billion, or 0.4 percent. In contrast, economists had expected a 0.5 percent increase in spending and a 0.2 percent increase in incomes.

Personal savings — DPI less PCE plus interest payments and transfer payments — declined to $702.6 billion in March, from $758.6 billion in February. The personal savings rate, which calculates personal saving as a percentage of DPI, rang in at 5.3 percent in March, down from February’s 5.7 percent rate.

Initial Jobless Claims 

First time claims for unemployment insurance filed by the newly unemployed during the week ending April 25 plummeted to 262,000, a decline of 34,000 claims from the prior week’s revised level of 296,000, the Employment and Training Administration reported last week. This was he lowest point for layoffs since April 15, 2000’s total of 259,000 claims. 

Meanwhile, the four-week moving average, considered a more stable read on layoffs, ticked down to 283,750 claims, a decline of 1,250 claims from the preceding week’s revised average of 285,000 claims. 

“Initial jobless claims continue to signal tightening in the labor market,” RDQ Economics co-founders John Ryding and Conrad DeQuadros wrote in a note to clients. “[The data] suggest that the softening in job growth in March may well have been a temporary quirk.” 

Construction Spending 

Construction spending dipped 06 percent in March, falling to an annual rate of $966.6 billion, the Census Bureau reported last week. That said, March’s spending was still 2 percent higher than March 2014’s pace of $947.3 billion. 

Spending on private construction, which accounts for roughly 70 percent of all construction spending, dropped 0.3 percent to an annual rate of $704.7 billion, with residential construction dropping 1.6 percent to an annual rate of $349 billion. Spending on single-family homes dropped by 1.8 percent, and construction spending on multi-family units fell 2.1 percent. 

Economists projected a ramp-up in residential construction spending during the April-to-June timeframe as the weather warms and home-selling season gets underway in earnest. 

This week we can expect: Monday — March factory orders from the Census Bureau. Tuesday — March balance of trade from the Census Bureau. Wednesday — First quarter productivity from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Thursday — Initial jobless claims for last week from the Employment and Training Administration; March consumer credit from the Federal Reserve. Friday — March wholesale inventories from the Census Bureau; April payrolls, unemployment rate, hourly earnings and average workweek from the Bureau of Labor of Statistics.

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Are you looking to Downsize?!

Please join us for our upcoming downsizing seminar on May 28th. Free lunch will be provided for those registered to attend.  Please call 434-879-3275 to register or ask questions.  We look forward to seeing you there!

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13 Rules Today’s New Home Buyers Can Learn From The Past

The zero-down, risk-everything days are over. Time to go back to money basics for buying your first home. Many of today’s first-time homebuyers are millennials — the generation born in the ’80s and ’90s. They are getting married, starting families, and stepping into the real estate arena for the first time. This generation grew up in a real estate boom, followed by a bust and an insane decade of home-price escalation, wide-scale underfinancing, and subprime lending. Having witnessed the housing market’s volatility, millennials may be wondering what new rules apply in this evolving real estate realm. Luckily, the “new rules” are the same tried-and-true rules of home buying from years past. Here are 13 rules for millennials looking to buy — while avoiding another burst housing bubble. If you can’t afford the home, don’t buy it. Don’t purchase a home blindly. Research and learn about the area, get advice from others, and study all the available data. Avoid “creative financing”: buy properties with a traditional 15- or 30-year loan. Sleep soundly knowing your mortgage payment will be the same each month for the entire mortgage term. Always put down 20% of the purchase price. Buy a house for 20% less than the amount the bank is willing to lend and you’ll never be house poor. You’re not just buying a house, you’re buying a neighborhood. It’s tough to qualify for a mortgage; plus, qualifications are more stringent these days. Keep great financial records, and be patient throughout the process. Don’t expect the market to appreciate and create more value in your home. Don’t overpay for a house you can’t really afford in hopes of market appreciation making up the difference. Less is more. A smaller, practical, easy-to-maintain house is the new, big, rambling mansion. Actively manage your credit, and shoot for an excellent score (above 750). Plan to stay in your home at least five years. Think you’ll need to sell before then? Then forgo homeownership and keep renting until you are ready to settle. Budget for all the costs of homeownership — not just the monthly mortgage payment. Be sure you have the funds for property taxes, insurance, upkeep, and even an emergency repair fund. If your job security is in question and your industry flat, don’t buy yet. For a generation who may think risking everything and buying homes with zero down is the norm, these rules may seem new. But as the saying goes, everything old eventually becomes new again. In this new era, millennials simply need to take a cue from the past to buy safely and securely in the current housing market.  

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